Friday, 18 May 2012

Pressure Points for Asthma


Original source: glamour.com


A
bout 15 years ago, I was teaching a children’s class when one of the boys involved asked me whether he could stand off to one side to catch his breath.


I asked him what was wrong.

“I’ve got asthma,” he explained.

I let another Black Belt take over the class while I showed the youngster a combination of pressure points and breathing techniques. He said that he would practise them faithfully.

He did.  During the next few months, he’d go to the side of the class whenever he felt the need to catch his breath. Invariably, he’d use the techniques that I’d shown him. In fact, those techniques became a core part of his training – deep and prolonged breathing to increase his lung capacity coupled with pressure points to calm and control his asthma.



Original source: blogesaurus.com


The following are the techniques that I showed him –

1.  B 13 – with your right arm reach across the front and behind your left shoulder. Press or massage in circles the B 13 point (appx. 1 finger width down from the tip of the shoulder blade. It lies in between the shoulder blade and the spine). Inhale slowly and deeply through the nose; exhale very slowly and deeply through the mouth. For deeper relaxation, please close your eyes. Try this for a minute. Then switch over to the B 13 point beside the right shoulder blade. Press or massage with your left hand.

2.  K 27 – you’ll find this point just below the collarbone where the collarbone and sternum meet. Cross your arms in front of you. Place your right hand index and middle finger on the left K 27 point and your left hand index and middle finger on the right K 27 points. Please close your eyes. Press or massage in gentle circles while breathing very slowly and deeply. 1 to 2 minutes.


Original source: columbiatribune.com

3.  L 1– In the groove where the lateral side of the chest and the shoulder meet appx. 3 finger widths below the collarbone. In fact, if you press or massage with the index, middle and ring fingers combined, you’ll access both L1 and L2. L2 lies just below the lateral end of the collarbone. Again, cross your arms; right hand touches the left side, left hand touches the right side. Breathe slowly and deeply with your eyes closed. 1 to 2 minutes.

4.  L 9 – at the lateral end of the distal crease on the inside of both wrists just below the base of the thumb. Press or massage slowly. 1 minute please for each wrist.

5.  L 10 – In the centre of the pad of both thumbs. 1 minute please for each wrist.

These techniques are highly traditional in the martial arts world and have been used for centuries. However, always check with a physician before you try them. Never stop taking medication for asthma without first consulting a medical professional.


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