Monday, 30 July 2012

8 Pieces of Silk - #6


Slowly raise the left hand while lowering the right hand


C
hi Kung plays an important role in traditional Chinese medicine.



It can clear blockages in the energy meridians; stimulate or calm the internal organs; combine all of the body’s physical systems into one harmonious whole; deeply reduce stress; revitalize mind, body and spirit; and promote longevity.

That’s quite the w0nder drug! The only thing – Chi Kung isn’t a drug.  It’s a form of meditative exercise. Different from regular stretching and calisthenics, Chi Kung actually exercises the organs and energy pathways along with regular bone and sinew. It’s as complete an exercise as you can get!

The 8 Pieces of Silk is one of the most popular Chi Kung routines. We’re slowly closing in on the end of the routine. But there are some really great postures left – and today we explore on of the most important…and one of the most universal power trajectories throughout the world of the martial arts.

25.  After the last “bow and arrow” posture, please leave sei ping mah (4 point horse stance) by sliding the right foot back in to the left foot. Your hands come to your sides. Your back is straight but relaxed. Breathing – exhale through the nose.

Slowly raise both hands to the height of your abdomen. From there, separate them by slowly raising your left hand up the left side of your body while at the same time lowering your right hand down the right side of your body. Breathing – inhale through the nose.

At the completion of the posture, your left palm faces upward, as though holding up the sky. The fingers of your left hand point to the right.

Your right palm faces downward, as though connecting with the ground. The fingers of your right hand point forward.




Slowly raise the right hand while lowering the left hand



26.  Slowly lower your left hand while raising your right hand. Breathing – exhale through the nose.

Both hands come back together in front of the abdomen.

From there, separate them again by slowly raising your right hand up the right side of your body while at the same time lowering your left hand down the left side of your body. Breathing – inhale through the nose.

At the completion of the posture, your right palm faces upward, as though holding up the sky. The fingers of your right hand point to the left.

Your left palm faces downward, as though connecting with the ground. The fingers of your left hand point forward.

This is one of my favourite parts of the routine.  Other forms of Chi Kung utilize this posture as well. I like it because it’s both dynamic and subtle.

I thank Sifu Greg Magwood for his demonstration of these techniques. A deeply intelligent and thoughtful practitioner of a wide range of martial arts, I highly recommend him as a teacher. He can be contacted through Magwood Martial Arts on Facebook.

As I mentioned above, we’re reaching the conclusion to this wonderful routine. I’ll post a few more postures soon!
  



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