Wednesday, 11 July 2012

Knee Recovery


Gently bring the foot in toward you

Source: sutterhealth.org

T
he knee. It’s a part of the human anatomy that does take a lot of day to day impact. But in sports - and the martial arts - that impact can be devastating.

Running, football, hockey, tennis, rugby….the assorted ways in which the knee joint can be injured can vary from using poor, worn down footwear to receiving a full impact blow during a tackle in a rugby game.

Recovery rates may vary with the type and extent of the injury involved. I do have a small rehab strategy you can use if the injury is minimal - and only with your doctor’s approval.

The routine is very simple and its objective is to bring your knee back to full range of motion.

1.  Flexion. Lie on your stomach.  Bend your leg slowly and gently with the heel moving toward you upper leg.  Hold for 5 seconds.  Lower the leg gently.  Relax.  Do 10 reps.  Never do this to the point where your leg hurts.



Don't lift the leg just yet - gently push it along the floor

Source: wowhealth.ca

2.  Extension. Sit on the floor, couch, etc. with your leg bent.  Push your leg straight as much as possible. Hold for 5 seconds.  Do 10 reps.  Never do this to the point where your leg hurts.

In addition, try this routine for the next 6 days -

Day 1 - tighten the quads (muscles above the knee) for 5 seconds, relax for 5 seconds.  Do this 10 times every hour. 

Day 2 - tighten for 6 seconds, relax for 6 seconds.  Again do this 10 times every hour.

Day 3 -  tighten for 7 seconds, relax for 7 seconds.  Again do this 10 times every hour.

Day 4 -  tighten for 8 seconds, relax for 8 seconds.  Again do this 10 times every hour.

Day 5 -  tighten for 9 seconds, relax for 9 seconds.  Again do this 10 times 4 times a day.

Day 6-  tighten for 10 seconds, relax for 10 seconds.  Again do this 10 times 4 times a day.

For the hamstrings (back of the legs above the knee)...

1.   Sit up. Bend your knee slightly with the foot flat on the couch, bed, floor, etc.

2.   Tighten the back of your upper leg. (Without actually moving your foot, imagine your foot sliding in toward you as you tighten the hamstrings).

3.  Follow the same 6 day formula of tension and relaxation for the hamstrings as you do for the quads.

The routines above should help you recover both your range of motion and joint stability. Again, please do these only after a medical diagnosis and with the approval of your doctor!

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