Wednesday, 1 April 2015

Ankle Pain

Original Source: myorthoteam.com



T
reachery thy name is…ankle.



Twisting (pardon the pun) around Hamlet’s words directed toward his mother, we can easily vent the same type of anger toward a piece of our anatomy which sometimes gives out when the party has just begun.

Jogging anyone? Did you ever have that perfect day when the rhythm of the run is in perfect sync with life, when the air is crisp with energy and you have that feeling of running toward the sun?

But then you take that next exultant step, and your ankle rolls to the outside. Knowing the medical term for what just happened – over pronation – doesn’t really help during the limp home. Anyway, curse words fall easier from the tongue than the term over pronation.

Or you’re sitting at your desk in the office, and after a morning of keyboarding, you rise, looking forward to lunch, and there it is…ankle pain. Like forklift operator, like a trucker, you’re muscles are tight from holding one position. Now you suddenly require these muscles to turn because the lunch room is over to the right.

Of course strong ankles can be a preventative blessing, as can flexibility, which is why I advise forklift operators and truckers to ease out of their long-held sitting postures, and first test the waters by gently rotating their feet and stretching their legs a bit. Solves a lot of problems.

Martial artists aren’t immune to the curse of the treacherous ankle. You’ve never had such a good time on the Judo mats, thrown and being thrown, in fact your sweat is an elixir. But an overextended lift with a two hundred fifty plus pound uke on your shoulder and the ankle is in retreat. What does a Taekwondo practitioner tell the orthopaedic specialist after her fiasco with a flying kick? – “I landed the wrong way.”

Of course, we should be vigilant during a jog, during work, during martial arts training, stopping once in a while  - even during a jog – to stretch and rebalance the legs.


Original Source: pafootdoctors.com


The following are some basic pressure points you can use to help ease ankle pain.

K 3 – this point is located in the hollow between the ankle bone and the Achilles’ tendon. Good for ankle pain. Also helps with swollen feet. Use this point to help 
strengthen the feet. (Since they’re located in the same area, you can press or gently rub K 3 and B 60 together at the same time).

Do not use the K 3 point if you are pregnant.

K 6 – in the depression below the medial malleolus. Also helps with swollen ankles.  (K 6 and B 62 can be pressed or gently rubbed together at the same time).




Original Source: www.vickifiddespodiatry.co.uk

B 60 – this point is located in the hollow between the ankle bone and the Achilles’ tendon, on the opposite side of K 3. (Since they’re located in the same area, you can press or gently rub K 3 and B 60 together at the same time).

B 62 – in the depression below the lateral malleolus. (K 6 and B 62 can be pressed or gently rubbed together at the same time).

GB 40 – in the depression in front of the lateral malleolus.

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